Posts Tagged ‘eavesdropping’

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We’ve had Panic Rooms and Safe Rooms, but have you every heard of Quiet Rooms?  Nope, me neither!

Below is an extract taken from RFID Protect’s website, where this new service is being offered to anyone that’s ultra concerned about their privacy.

An interesting product, with a super-glossy sales brochure to boot – maybe this is the shape of things to come!

Silence is golden, or so the saying goes.

But in a world where corporate espionage and phone hacking are commonplace a space that’s shielded from electronic eavesdropping is arguably worth more than its weight in gold.

Quiet Rooms are just that – secure areas within your office or home where signals from mobile phone or electronic surveillance devices cannot penetrate. Built into the actual fabric of the building (normally at the construction stage), we offer low-impact solutions for those that really value their privacy. Outstanding performance with minimum intrusion our Quiet Rooms are a synthesis of functionality, cutting-edge technology and design excellence.

Download the Quiet Rooms promotional brochure (PDF 1.2MB)

Eavesdropping attacks on RFID enabled devices, such as e-passports and contactless credit cards or secure door entry systemsThis extraordinary academic paper, with its practical experiments, presents actual ‘proof-of-concept’ eavesdropping attacks across a range of RFID enabled devices.

The author, G.P. Hancke (of the British-based Smart Card Centre / Information Security Group at University of London), demonstrates how he implemented successful attacks on the three most popular High Frequency (HF) standards: ISO 14443A, ISO 14443B and ISO 15693.

What some may find particularly disturbing is that in each case Hancke not only describes the equipment needed to execute an attack, but also how an effective RFID receiver kit can be constructed for less than £50.

“Even though the self-build RF receiver did not achieve the same results as commercial equipment – it does illustrate that eavesdropping is not beyond the means of the average attacker.” says Hancke.

Read the full PDF report here

And then protect yourself against unauthorised ‘contactless’ eavesdropping here