Posts Tagged ‘passport sleeve’

Here in the UK, the bio-metric passport project is now in its fourth year.  By all accounts the roll-out has proved successful, although there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the system is not entirely fool-proof; leaving a small window of opportunity for unscrupulous individuals to ‘skim’ the data contained therein.  It’s been argued that this can be done from distances up to a metre away, and what’s more – you wouldn’t feel a thing!

As someone who’s not keen to have their privacy compromised – even if this is just a ‘long shot’ – I’ve decided to put together a DIY guide to keeping your RFID enabled passport secure from skimmers. So, we’re going to use the ‘Faraday Cage’ approach of using aluminium foil to create a secure environment for our passport – rendering it inactive, whilst inside the foil.  Yes, I realise that this smacks of ‘tin hat paranoia’ – but there’s compelling evidence to suggest it works – as the signal from our passive RFID chip is effectively blocked from the reader; or ‘hacker’ as the case may be.

You will need:

2 x A3 paper
A4 size strips of aluminium foil
C5 sized envelope/s
3M spray mount
1 x scalpel
1 x newspaper
1 x ruler
1 x strong adhesive (PVA / wood glue)
1 x kettle (for streaming the C5 envelope open)

Instructions:

  • Take your kettle, fill it with about one cup of water, and heat until boiling
  • Taking great care with this next step – steam the folded seams of your C5 envelop, until the original glue relaxes and you can peal the flaps apart
  • Once all flaps are released – unfold your envelop and allow to dry
  • Once dry, place your unfolded envelop between two sheets of A3 paper (creating a sandwich) and iron the top sheet of A3, thus in doing so the C5 envelop will be flattened.
  • Remove the 2 sheets of A3 paper, take the (now flattened) envelop and place it over a sheet of aluminium foil and ensure that there’s sufficient foil to cover your envelop.  Cut to size – allowing for at least 1 cm overlap on all edges.
  • Place the aluminium foil onto a sheet of old newspaper – spray well with 3M spray mount
  • Place inside face of envelop onto the sticky side of the foil – you’re attempting to glue the foil to the inside of your envelop.
  • Place a sheet of A3 paper over the top, then rest a heavy book on top – allowing up to 24 hrs for the glue to adhere
  • Once fully dried – and using a ruler – trim all edges with a scalpel, to the original dimensions of your C5 envelop.  TAKE CARE OF FINGERS!!!
  • Finally, crease any folds again to original C5 envelop configurations.
  • Use the strong adhesive to join the folded seams together.

You should now have a C5 envelope with a foil lining inside. All you need do now is insert your RFID enabled passport and close the flap.  You can use a paper clip to keep the flap closed.

All done!

Although with hindsight, you could well be better off simply buying an RFID protected passport sleeve (for around £2.99) from one of the suppliers listed elsewhere on this site. (Click here to buy from UK-supplier RFID Protect.)

And unless you already have most of the items detailed above then it’s probably also a cheaper option – but of course less fun!

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Google has finally accepted that it harvested personal data from wireless networks as its fleet of vehicles drove down residential roads taking photographs for the Street View project. And yet only a few months ago it would have screamed ‘blue murder’ if anyone intimated that this had happened. Now it transpires that millions of internet users have potentially been affected. Google’s acknowledgment of guilt is an interesting U-turn from its earlier assertion that no sensitive personal information had been taken.

Google has now confessed that its, “…vehicles had also gather(ed) information about the location of wireless networks, the devices which connect computers to the telecommunications network via radio waves.”

The Daily Telegraph newspaper reported that, “…Privacy International lodged a complaint with Scotland Yard earlier this year about Google’s Street View activities and officers are still considering whether a crime has been committed. Google is facing prosecution in France and a class action in the US, with similar lawsuits pending in other countries.”

The full story can be read at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/

Whilst this development does not relate specifically to RFID or contactless technology as such, nonetheless it’s an excellent example of a large multi-national operation initially stating – “guys, what’s the problem – there’s nothing to worry about your wireless internet connection because we’ve ensured that it’s 100% secure” – and then a few months later we arrive at a different place – “…er, you know that technology that we told you was secure, well there’s been a slight issue with it and as a result your email, passwords and other sensitive information are now in the public domain – whoops, sorry about that…”

Therefore it could be reasonably argued that whilst today contactless credit, debit, Oyster, and Olympics 2012 RFID passes are all being sold as 100% safe – tomorrow may bring with it a somewhat different outlook…

Watch this space, and in the meantime can you afford not to protect your biometric details now?

Dutch security researchers rode the London Underground free for a day after easily using an ordinary laptop to clone the “smartcards” commuters use to pay fares, a hack that highlights a serious security flaw because similar cards provide access to thousands of government offices, hospitals and schools.

There are more than 17 million of the transit cards, called Oyster Cards, in circulation. Transport for London says the breach poses no threat to passengers and “the most anyone could gain from a rogue card is one day’s travel.” But this is about more than stealing a free fare or even cribbing any personal information that might be on the cards.

Oyster Cards feature the same Mifare chip used in security cards that provide access to thousands of secure locations. Security experts say the breach poses a threat to public safety and the cards should be replaced.

“The cryptography is simply not fit for purpose,” security consultant Adam Laurie told the Telegraph. “It’s very vulnerable and we can expect the bad guys to hack into it soon if they haven’t already.”

By Alexander Lew  Email Author| June 24, 2008

Source: http://www.wired.com/autopia/2008/06/hackers-crack-l/